Technologies

Across all of the subjects, there is a great importance placed on the design process that the students get to explore. The creative risk-taking process that students are engaged in, is foundational across all subjects. The valued skill acquisition, that is personal, and challenging, enables students to make life-based solutions to complex problems.

 

Year 7 & 8: Food and Textiles Technology (studied for 1 semester per year)

The central focus for Food & Textile Technology is the well-being of people within the context of their personal, family, community and work roles.  Food and Textile Technology makes a contribution to students’ understandings of Technology Practices and Materials Technology as well as providing knowledge, understandings and skills for living. The course is rich in opportunities for students to develop creativity, personal concentration, fine motor and planning skills, self-esteem and project and task management

Course Content: Students will study one semester of Food & Textile Technology, one term in both fields. Each field has unique learning and different practical and theoretical perspectives. 

Food and Nutrition:  The food and nutrition aspect of the course investigates in both a practical and theoretical manner; food hygiene and safety, preparation methods and techniques, presentation and garnishing, basic nutrition, nutrition guides and serving sizes.

Textiles: The textiles aspect of the course investigates in both a practical and theoretical manner; fabric manipulation and machining; incorporating the principles of designing, making and appraising through working with fabric, safety and 3D visualisation of objects from a 2D form.

 

Year 7 & 8: Information & Communication Technology (studied for 1 semester per year)

Information and Communication Technology provides students with the opportunity to become familiar with a variety of information literacy skills and information and communication technology software packages. This course also encourages students to develop keyboarding skills and an appreciation of ergonomics and workplace health and safety issues when working with computers. Project work follows the Design, Develop and Evaluate cycle. Information and Communication Technology provides an excellent range of skills that enhance students’ studies across the curriculum and will help to prepare them for life in an increasingly digital world.

Course Outline:

  •           Computer systems and networks
  •           Locating and analysing information from the web and other online resources
  •           Microsoft Office Skills using Word and OneNote
  •           Spreadsheets and Databases using Microsoft Excel and Access
  •           Graphic Design and Image Manipulation using Adobe Photoshop
  •          Web 2.0 tools and online learning environments (Moodle)
  •          Computer systems and networks
  •           Locating and analysing information from the web and other online resources
  •           Microsoft Office Skills using Word and OneNote
  •          Spreadsheets and Databases using Microsoft Excel and Access
  •           Graphic Design and Image Manipulation using Adobe Photoshop
  •           Web 2.0 tools and online learning environments (Moodle)

Year 9: Food and Textiles Technology

Food and textile technology is an interdisciplinary subject that draws on a range of fields including nutrition, dietetics, textiles and fashion technology. Student learn to think critically and creatively and also develop initiative and enterprise in making informed choices and engaging in practise related to food, nutrition and textiles.

The course aims to foster creative risk-taking in order to encourage a variety of thinking, manipulative and practical skills.

Course Outline:

  •          Food Technology
  •          Nutritional needs of growth and development
  •          Design of menu, creating of meals, modifying and evaluating diets and recipes for a range of needs
  •          Practical preparation of meals
  •          Investigation and participation in design briefs
  •          Influences of food choices on well being
  •          Textile Technology
  •          Development and implementation of techniques to create textile items
  •          Exploration of textiles properties
  •          Investigation and participation in design briefs
  •          Exploration of embellishment areas
  •          Consumer focus on textile engagement

 

Year 9: Information Technology

Students identify real world problems and design and implement solutions using information technology. They develop confidence with technology and gain valuable skills that are transferable to other areas. The course is very ‘hands-on’ and students will learn to use a wide range of current software applications. They will also learn to follow the software development cycle (design, develop, evaluate).

All resources for the subject are provided within the classroom environment. Students will have access to the software for the course, including industry standard applications such as the Adobe suite, on their laptops. They will also have access to extensive online learning resources to help them become competent in the use of these applications. The project based learning approach promotes active and flexible learning that engages students in real world tasks where they develop skills useful both now and in the future.

Information Technology gives students a platform for studying Senior Information Processing and Technology (IPT) during Years 11 and 12. More importantly, Information Technology provides an excellent range of skills that enhance students’ studies across the curriculum and will help to prepare them for life in a digital world.

Course Outline:

  •          Design and development in 2D and 3D environments
  •          Design and development of mobile and web based solutions
  •          Investigation of social and ethical implications
  •          Real world application of emerging technologies
  •          Exploration of human-computer interaction and user interfaces
  •          Evaluation of technological solutions for accessibility and usability

 

 

Year 10: Food and Textiles Technology

Designers within any discipline should be able to appreciate what is the difference between effective and non-effective design. Within the field of textiles, we need to consider fundamentals in terms of Elements and Principals of design, as well as personal design aesthetic. Actualisation of design concepts and thinking is both challenging and rewarding in terms of participating with the design process.

Food and nutrition are integral aspects of everyday life for all. This subject aims to demystify nutrition areas, whilst developing into the how and why food preparation responds in different ways. Food and nutrition is an interdisciplinary subject which draws on a range of fields including nutrition, food science and food technology. Students learn to think critically and creatively and also develop initiative and enterprise in making informed choices and engaging in practise related to food and nutrition.

Course Outline:

  •          Elements and Principles of Design
  •          Interior design
  •          Meeting design briefs
  •          Textiles manipulation within soft furnishing
  •          Materials knowledge
  •          Food production
  •          Food science, including investigative approaches to food preparation
  •          Safety and hygiene
  •          Meal plan analysis
  •          Nutrition models
  •          Design brief exploration

 

Year 10: Information Technology

Students identify real world problems and design and implement solutions using information technology. They develop confidence with technology and gain valuable skills that are transferable to other areas. The course is very ‘hands-on’ and students will learn to use a wide range of current software applications. They will also learn to follow the software development cycle (design, develop, evaluate).

All resources for the subject are provided within the classroom environment. Students will have access to the software for the course, including industry standard applications such as the Adobe suite, on their laptops. They will also have access to extensive online learning resources to help them become competent in the use of these applications. The project based learning approach promotes active and flexible learning that engages students in real world tasks where they develop skills useful both now and in the future.

Information Technology gives students a platform for studying Senior Information Processing and Technology (IPT) during Years 11 and 12. More importantly, Information Technology provides an excellent range of skills that enhance students’ studies across the curriculum and will help to prepare them for life in a digital world.

Course Outline: Students can study this subject having not studied the subject in Year 9. In Year 10, students will engage in an extended study unit where they have considerable choice and freedom over the learning experiences and topics they choose to study. This enables the course to be flexible and adapt to individual student needs and to current advances in technology. Elective units that students might choose to study include:Video Editing and Production, Robotics and Programming, Game Design and Development, Web Design and Development, 3D Design and Development including 3D Printing, Mobile App Design and Development, Multimedia Design and Production, Databases and Information Management Systems, Social and Ethical Implications of Technology.

 

Year 11 & 12: Home Economics

Junior Food and Textile Technology is an advantage but not essential. Home Economics provides avenues for career pathways in Food Science and Technology, Nutrition and Dietetics, Community and Personal Health, Design, Control and Production in the Clothing Industry, Interior Design and Built Environment, Consumer Advice, Social Justice and Hospitality.

The belief that today's action and attitudes determine present and future wellbeing is central to Home Economics. Home Economics is concerned with the development of deep understandings about the reciprocal impacts that capabilities, choices and priorities of individuals, families and communitiehave on each other's wellbeing. Through the exploration of pertinent practices and issues, Home Economics education promotes action in pursuit of individual and family wellbeing in the   context of maintaining healthy and sustainable locaand global communities. There are three areas of study, that content and skills are based and these are: Individuals, Families and Communities, Nutrition and Food, and Textiles and Fashion.

Course Outline:

  •          Individuals, Families and Communities: Sustainable Housing
  •          Food and Nutrition:It's all about me - Adolescent Nutrition, Balancing our food inequities
  •          Textiles and Fashion: Mods, Punks and Indie -Our Fashion Identity, Stewards of Our Textiles Environment.

 

Year 11 & 12: Information Processing & Technology

There are no pre-requisite subjects to study IPT; however, students who have undertaken Information Technology in Years 9 and 10 are certainly well prepared to tackle the course. IPT is not biased towards Mathematics/Science students, communication and problem-solving skills are equally valued.

IPT is a good basis for courses at Griffith, QUT and UQ in Information Technology or for a Computer Science course. It is also very useful as a general education subject.

All software used in the course will be made available on student laptops.

IPT seeks to develop an awareness and understanding of the concepts, practices and effects of information technology. As well, it aims to equip students with problem-solving skills that will allow them to design, develop and evaluate solutions, and it encourages students to think critically and purposefully about the uses of information technology. It is suitable as a course of study for both students who are university bound and others with an interest in information technology.

Course Outline:  Human Computer Interaction: Students examine different types of interfaces and learn how to design good interfaces for effective human and computer interaction. Students will recognise the fundamental importance of user-centred design and will apply these concepts in their software and information projects.

Information and Intelligent Systems: This section deals with the design and implementation of an information system, including SQL querying, menu design and screen design. Students implement their information system using MS Access. The intelligent systems component examines robotics, machine vision and natural language, knowledge-based systems and neural networks. Students implement a simple knowledge-based system using ES Builder.

Software and Systems Engineering: Students gain software development expertise and programming skills with Visual Basic (Visual Studio 2013), an event-driven programming language. They produce software using the Software Development Cycle and this section culminates in a game based project. System engineering examines the interactions between humans, software and hardware. It encompasses how computers and computer systems are organised, designed and implemented. It includes knowledge of types of hardware and software, networking, computer communication and operating systems.

Social and Ethical Implications: The aim of this topic is to help students develop an appreciation and understanding of the impact that developments in information technology have on themselves and communities worldwide. It includes an examination of such topics as: computers and crime, viruses, privacy, ergonomic and health issues, freedom of information and the use of computers in society.

 

Year 11 & 12: Early Childhood Studies

Early Childhood Studies is an Authority-registered subject and therefore does not contribute to the 20 semester units required for an OP, but it does contribute to the 20 semester units required for a Selection Rank Score and to credits towards a QCE. The study of Early Childhood develops many life skills and is an effective grounding for students considering TAFE Certificate Courses in Childcare and any careers involving children, for example Early Childhood Teaching or Community Services.

Early Childhood seeks to assist students to develop a knowledge and understanding of early childhood development so that they can perform care giving roles, respond to cultural values, be aware of ethical issues, develop vocational skills and operate effectively, both independently, and as a team member.

Course Outline:  This study of Early Childhood comprises core units, fundamentals of early childhood and practices in early childhood learning.

The course additionally explores; play and creativity, literacy and numeracy skills, being in a safe place, health and physical well-being and indoor and outdoor learning environments. Each unit of work focuses on the notion that the first five years of life are critical in shaping children’s future growth and development, well-being and learning.

Overall, this study of Early Childhood Studies enables students to explore a variety of early childhood settings and observe, experience and use practices that promote the care of young children and give an awareness of the importance of quality early childhood education.

The course of study provides opportunities for students to interact with children aged from birth to five years, as this allows students to appreciate that children are unique individuals.

 

Year 11 & 12: Fashion

Fashion is a two-year Authority-registered subject and therefore does not contribute to the 20 semester units required for an OP, but does contribute to the 20 credit points needed for a QCE. The course of study has been designed to assist not only those students who are seeking a profession in the Fashion area, but also those who are interested in this industry. Excursions provide the students with a ‘hands-on’ approach to some of the areas of study covered.

Junior Food and Textile Technology is not a pre-requisite of entry into the subject.

Fashion is an integral part of everyday life, with individuals making choices about what clothing and accessories to wear. Fashion choice is determined through the integration of two or more of the following – culture, history, function, economic consideration, personal taste, peer group, availability and trends. Fashion choice ranges from the purely practical to the highly aesthetic and esoteric. The course will challenge student’s imagination to create, innovate and express themselves and their ideas.

Fashion design and production of these items involves knowledge, technical skills and problem solving relating to functional and aesthetic factors, embellishment and/or construction techniques. Building upon the traditional skills of fashion and design, students are encouraged to express individuality in a supportive environment.

Course Outline: Students will have the opportunity to design, construct and evaluate fashion and design items using a range of techniques to produce articles for an individual or group context.

The core areas covered in this course will be: Fashion Culture, Fashion Technologies and Fashion Design. These core areas will be covered within the elective unites; Adornment, Theatrical Design, Visual Merchandising, Fashion Watch, Cyclic Nature of Fashion and Designer Collections. Scope will also be given to allow students to follow their individual passions in fashion and design.

 

 

 

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